Sukar Ala Sukar- A Website Design for Diabetes Education and Support for Saudi Arabian and Middle Eastern Children

May 6, 2010 at 8:30 am 1 comment

Sukar Ala Sukar is a website for 4th and 5th grade Saudi Arabian and Middle Eastern children to learn about diabetes. Nada Farhat, MD, designed this in my fall course, Online Consumer Health, and she and I revised her project to submit to the 2010 DiabetesMine™ Design Challenge, a competition “to encourage creative new tools for improving life with diabetes”, in the hopes that we would get funding to implement and evaluate the site.

Here is our description: We designed a website to meet the education and support needs of children with diabetes, at risk, or with diabetic family members who live in Saudi Arabia and other Middle Eastern countries or whose families are from these countries. Culture and language (English and Arabic) are embedded in the website design which includes separate areas for girls and boys in keeping with societal norms. The website goals are to increase awareness of diabetes and debunk myths children might have, which are carried out though text, video, games, recipes, and activities. Social media further reinforces education and provides peer support. Our goal is to develop and evaluate the effectiveness of the website with Saudi children in the US and in Saudi Arabia.

To me, this project is fascinating in three ways: the impact of culture on effective design; design of a bilingual site when one language is read left-to-right and the other right-to-left; and how health website design for children is different than for adults. Nada’s final paper for the course addresses many of these through her competitive analysis and research. Our initial answers to the culture question are in the entry. For instance, one way to address cultural norms is to separate the site by gender. Another is to use drawings of people since photographs of girls violate cultural norms. We know that bilingual design can be challenging for languages that are more similar than English and Arabic, such as English and Spanish, especially when one language uses more characters than the other to express the same thing. We also know the importance of localization. And for children’s design we want to be consistent with best practices yet be fresh.

We welcome your feedback.

Entry filed under: health, online health communities, Uncategorized, usability, Web 2.0. Tags: , , , , , .

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1 Comment Add your own

  • 1. Web Design  |  May 19, 2010 at 2:02 am

    This is a beautiful cause for web design

    Reply

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Lisa Gualtieri, PhD, ScM

Lisa GualtieriLisa Gualtieri is Assistant Professor at Tufts University School of Medicine in the Department of Public Health and Community Medicine. She is Director of the Certificate Program in Digital Health Communication. Lisa teaches Designing Health Campaigns using Social Media, Social Media and Health, Mobile Health Design, and Digital Strategies for Health Communication. Contact Lisa: lisa.gualtieri@tufts.edu

@lisagualtieri


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